Aerial mosquito spraying study finds no immediate public health risks

In what researchers say is the first public health study of the aerial mosquito spraying method to prevent West Nile virus, a UC Davis study analyzed emergency department records from Sacramento area hospitals during and immediately after aerial sprayings in the summer of 2005. Physicians and scientists from the university and from the California Department of Public Health found no increase in specific diagnoses that are considered most likely to be associated with pesticide exposure, including respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, eye and neurological conditions.

via Aerial mosquito spraying study finds no immediate public health risks.


Deadly Year For Encephalitis Feared In India : NPR

A mosquito-borne disease that preys on the young and malnourished is sweeping across poverty-riven northern India again this monsoon season, with officials worried it could be the deadliest outbreak in nearly a decade.

Encephalitis has already killed at least 118 children this year, and authorities fear the death toll could reach about 1,000, said Dr. R.N. Singh of the Encephalitis Eradication Movement, an Indian nonprofit.

via Deadly Year For Encephalitis Feared In India : NPR.


Cases of Rare But Deadly Encephalitis Rising Among Kids, Report Finds – US News and World Report

In 2012 alone, Massachusetts had seven documented cases of Eastern equine encephalitis, which is the highest number of infections reported since 1956. What’s more, the first human case ever in Vermont was reported in 2012. And, public health surveillance indicates that the virus that causes Eastern equine encephalitis may now have traveled as far north as Maine and Nova Scotia, Canada.

Results of the review are published in the February issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Ahmed said that better detection of the virus is at least part of the reason for the increasing numbers of people diagnosed with the disease, but he doesn’t believe that better testing accounts for all the new cases.

“There’s a sense that the activity of the virus has increased. People are living closer to habitats of mosquitoes in nature, and global warming is allowing mosquitoes to be active longer. Most mosquitoes thrive in warmer weather,” Ahmed said.

via Cases of Rare But Deadly Encephalitis Rising Among Kids, Report Finds – US News and World Report.


Cases of Rare But Deadly Encephalitis Rising Among Kids, Report Finds – US News and World Report

In 2012 alone, Massachusetts had seven documented cases of Eastern equine encephalitis, which is the highest number of infections reported since 1956. What’s more, the first human case ever in Vermont was reported in 2012. And, public health surveillance indicates that the virus that causes Eastern equine encephalitis may now have traveled as far north as Maine and Nova Scotia, Canada.

Results of the review are published in the February issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Ahmed said that better detection of the virus is at least part of the reason for the increasing numbers of people diagnosed with the disease, but he doesn’t believe that better testing accounts for all the new cases.

via Cases of Rare But Deadly Encephalitis Rising Among Kids, Report Finds – US News and World Report.


Vabiotech licenses Inviragen technology for Japanese encephalitis vaccine production – Pharmaceutical Business Review

Under the license, VABIOTECH is expected to develop and commercialize JE vaccine in Vietnam, Cambodia and Myanmar.

via Vabiotech licenses Inviragen technology for Japanese encephalitis vaccine production – Pharmaceutical Business Review.


Officials Analyze West Nile And Meningitis For 2012

Only a small proportion of West Nile cases are officially reported because many people experience no symptoms and others only have common symptoms, such as a fever or aches and pains. Approximately one out of 150 cases of West Nile virus will progress into other diseases like encephalitis or meningitis.

via Officials Analyze West Nile And Meningitis For 2012.


Flu? Malaria? Disease forecasters look to the sky – WSJ.com

Some diseases are hard to forecast, such as West Nile virus. Last year, the U.S. suffered one of its worst years since the virus arrived in 1999. There were more than 2,600 serious illnesses and nearly 240 deaths.

Officials said the mild winter, early spring and very hot summer helped spur mosquito breeding and the spread of the virus. But the danger wasn’t spread uniformly. In Texas, the Dallas area was particularly hard-hit, while other places, including some with similar weather patterns and the same type of mosquitoes, were not as affected.

“Why Dallas, and not areas with similar ecological conditions? We don’t really know,” said Roger Nasci of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is chief of the CDC branch that tracks insect-borne viruses.

via Flu? Malaria? Disease forecasters look to the sky – WSJ.com.