Action Africa Inc. Launches a New Approach Against Malaria in Sierra Leone and Nigeria by Teaching Children to be Proactive Ambassadors

Action Africa is committed to providing environmental impact education at all levels, starting from elementary school and continuing to secondary schools through to tertiary institutions. Children are taught how to keep their environments clean and are encouraged to inspire adults to do the same. They are taught how broken pots, open containers, pot holes, and other areas which hold water are perfect environments for breeding mosquitoes; and taught that by limiting or eliminating the conditions that mosquitoes favor the population of these disease causing insects can be dramatically reduced.

via Action Africa Inc. Launches a New Approach Against Malaria in Sierra Leone and Nigeria by Teaching Children to be Proactive Ambassadors.

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AGA extends malaria control programme | Regional News 2013-02-19

More than 1.3 million people in 12 districts across the Upper East and Ashanti regions benefited from AGA Malaria programmes in 2012. Over 570,000 structures were sprayed in the last six months. In 2013, AGA Malaria is extending the programme to the West and Upper West regions, reaching an estimated further 1.2 million people. By the end of 2013 the programme should reach 22 districts, including additional areas in the Upper East region. With $133 million funding from the Global Fund, after five years AGA Malaria should be spraying in 40 districts and municipalities in malaria endemic areas, most in northern regions of Ghana.

The AGA Malaria programme has created significant local employment opportunities for residents of the beneficiary districts. In 2012, over 750 people were trained and employed to run the programme. In 2013, AGA Malaria is looking at employing and training an additional 1,400 staff. The number of employees should rise to over 3000 by end 2015.

via AGA extends malaria control programme | Regional News 2013-02-19.


Thousands meet for Mosquito control convention – NBC40.net

Thousands from around the Country, even the world, are in Atlantic City this week to celebrate the history of mosquito control, which began right here in New Jersey.

The National Mosquito Convention is meeting in Atlantic City as a tribute to New Jersey’s rich history in mosquito control.  Mosquito control began in the Garden State a hundred years ago and experts say information sharing is still key.

via Thousands meet for Mosquito control convention – NBC40.net.


Scientific team discovers new method to create vaccine against Chikungunya virus | Vaccine News Daily

The reemergence of Chikungunya virus exemplifies the need to develop new vaccines to target other emerging viral pathogens. Chikungunya is estimated to be responsible for several million human infections in the last decade. In addition, one of its vectors, the Aedes albopictus mosquito, is moving into new regions, meaning the infection rate is expected to climb. There is currently no licensed vaccine available to use against the illness.

Another benefit of the employed strategy is that prevents the attenuated phenotype reverting by mutation or recombination, reducing the possibility that the newly created virus strain could evolve back to a pathogenic version, according to EureakAlert.com.

via Scientific team discovers new method to create vaccine against Chikungunya virus | Vaccine News Daily.


BBC News – Brazil dengue cases almost triple as new strain spreads

Apart from Mato Grosso do Sul, seven other states across southern and central Brazil have been affected by the epidemic.

More than half of the cases have been caused by the DENV-4 strain of the virus, which was first detected in Brazil in 2011.

Mr Padilha said that because the strain was still relatively new to the country, more people were susceptible to infection.

via BBC News – Brazil dengue cases almost triple as new strain spreads.


Research suggests malaria can be defeated without a globally led eradication program

“Our findings suggest it may be possible for malaria elimination to proceed like a ratchet, tightening the grip on the disease region-by-region, country-by-country, until eradication is ultimately achieved – but without the need for a globally coordinated campaign.”

The research team[1] examined data from 1980 onwards for 30 countries which successfully eliminated malaria and also took part in the 1955 Global Malaria Eradication Programme (GMEP). In these countries, elimination[2] has become highly stable, transmission (or infection) has declined and resurgence has occurred far less frequently than traditional theory would predict.

Three potential reasons for this decline and stability of malaria have been suggested:

declines in transmission rates resulting from urbanization and economic development

a high-degree of transmission control from treating malaria cases combined with outbreak control

low-connectivity among places that are highly receptive to transmission

via Research suggests malaria can be defeated without a globally led eradication program.


Perception of malaria risk in a setting of reduced malaria transmission: a qualitative study in Zanzibar

Reasons for continued use of preventive practices include: fear of malaria returning to high levels, presence of mosquitoes during rainy seasons, and concern about local cases from other villages or imported cases from mainland Tanzania. Mosques, clinics, schools and community meetings were listed as most important sources of education.

However, residents express the desire for more education.

Conclusion: Health care providers and residents generally reported consistent use of malaria preventive measures. However, maintaining and continuing to reduce malaria transmission will require ongoing education for both health care providers and residents to reinforce the importance of using preventive measures.

via Perception of malaria risk in a setting of reduced malaria transmission: a qualitative study in Zanzibar.